4 Notable Books

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

by Neil Gaiman

This superb Neil Gaiman novel will leave you wandering the Sussex landcape for a while after reading the final pages. Atmospheric and engaging, where the magical hides behind the ordinary and the terrible shows up at your dinner table, this is a classic Gaiman horror, with a slight reminiscence of Clive Barker. In addition to the fantastical, Gaiman explores with heart and depth the vulnerability, fear, anxiety and helplessness of childhood in the face of adult power. You will relate to the narrator as you remember the nightmares of your own childhood, and the charm of the heroism found within these pages will have you wishing for more.

-Reviewed by Kimberly Powers

The Bluest Eye

by Toni Morrison

This is a very important book. The author herself writes of it in her afterword “...this is a terrible story about things one would rather not know anything about.” This book had me cringing and broken-hearted, devastated for its truths. It is brutal, provocative, depressing and uncomfortable, but real, honest, and eye-opening. Not an easy read, but a worthwhile one. If you feel like setting comfort aside and seeing the world from a disenfranchised perspective, this might be the book for you.

-Reviewed by Kimberly Powers

Without Their Permission

by Alexis Ohanian

Alexis Ohanian, founder of reddit.com, tells his story of starting a startup. It is an easy read while at the same time being packed full of information concerning startups, the Internet, business ventures and life in general. After selling reddit to Conde Nast, he got his nose into hipmonk.com and breadpig.com. A busy man, he still found time to write a great book.

-Reviewed by Jon Breninger

A Million Little Pieces

by James Frey

Despite the unwarranted controversy with the almighty Oprah, this is a touching and at times horrifying story of one man’s journey out of addition and into recovery, out of recovery and into life. His prose is truly his own. His story will haunt and edify all at once. If you have encountered any kind of misfortune in your own life, then you can relate in some way to Mr. Frey’s own downfall and his eventual emergence from the ashes of his past.

-Reviewed by Jon Breninger