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5:19 PM Thu, Dec. 13th

H-bomb controversy to be discussed on Feb. 12

The first hydrogen bomb test at Enewetak Atoll on November 1, 1952

Photo: U.S. Army Photographic Signal Corps

The first hydrogen bomb test at Enewetak Atoll on November 1, 1952

Why a hydrogen bomb?

On 31 January 1950 Pres. Harry S. Truman publicly declared the U.S. intention to develop a hydrogen bomb. The two primary motivations - the Soviet Union's first fission bomb during the previous fall; and the discovery of Klaus Fuchs' espionage activity at Los Alamos, uncovered just days before.

One of the most controversial decisions of the 1950s — whether the U.S. should develop hydrogen bombs — will be discussed in a talk by historian Bill Weiss on Sunday, Feb. 12.

“Brothers at Odds: the Fight for the Superbomb,” will be held at 2 p.m. at Temple B’rith Shalom, 2077 Brohner Way, Prescott.

Historian Bill Weiss will discuss one of the most controversial decisions of the 1950s ― whether the U.S. should develop hydrogen bombs. Refreshments will be served. 928-708-0018.

“The Soviet explosion of its first atomic bomb triggered an intense, divisive debate within the scientific community and the U.S. government on whether or not to develop, test and add to our nuclear arsenal H-bombs with thousands of times the destructive force of the atomic bombs,” Weiss noted.

Leading the struggle were four Jewish protagonists — two distinguished scientists and two high-level government officials.