Trump whips Prescott Valley crowd into a frenzy

Donald Trump speaks at the Trump for President Rally in the Prescott Valley Event Center Tuesday, October 4, 2016. (Les Stukenberg/The Daily Courier)

Photo by Les Stukenberg.

Donald Trump speaks at the Trump for President Rally in the Prescott Valley Event Center Tuesday, October 4, 2016. (Les Stukenberg/The Daily Courier)

PRESCOTT VALLEY – While it is true that Republican presidential candidate Donald J. Trump does not have a “stump speech” in the traditional sense, he always hits certain points in his campaign appearances, and, in Prescott Valley on Tuesday, Oct. 4., he drove them home, to the delight of the crowd.

Video

Donald Trump campaign visits Prescott Valley

Video By Brian M. Bergner Jr./The Daily Courier
Presidential candidate Donald Trump visited the Prescott Valley Event Center on Tuesday, Oct. 4.

Video By Brian M. Bergner Jr./The Daily Courier Presidential candidate Donald Trump visited the Prescott Valley Event Center on Tuesday, Oct. 4.

People began lining up hours before the 11 a.m. door-opening and, at one point, the line stretched along Florentine Road to Glassford Hill Road, perhaps a one-quarter of a mile.

The Prescott Valley Event Center’s seats were full, but only half of the floor was; a Daily Courier reporter said there were hundreds of Trump supporters still in line and were shut out when the Event Center’s doors were closed, leaving them to watch on a big screen TV outside.

Those inside were regaled by Arizona’s top Republican luminaries, such Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and former Gov. Jan Brewer; some, such as Pinal County Sheriff – and candidate for U.S. House – Paul Babeu, weren’t as well known here.

Arpaio is as much a celebrity in Yavapai County as his own.

“There’s a few things I’ve got to get off my chest, if you don’t mind,” Arpaio said, before saying that Trump is a law enforcement supporter, and questioning why the City of Phoenix would tell Trump to “take down” a campaign commercial that uses an image of Phoenix police officers in uniform shaking hands with Trump.

Brewer said Trump “is a truth-teller, just like me,” who “calls them like he sees them.

“He’s not afraid to call a radical Islamic terrorist, radical Islamic terrorist …and he’s not afraid to salute our flag, wear a flag pin, recite the Pledge of Allegiance, and recognize that we are, indeed, one nation under God.”

Trump entered to the Lee Greenwood song, “Proud to be an American,” and began with a bit of hyperbole, claiming there were 15,000 to 20,000 people still outside.

He said his economic plan was “very, very simple: Jobs, jobs, jobs,” adding that he would reduce taxes and regulations on small businesses “would be cut in half or lower than that,” if he is elected.

Trump said, “We are change, and (Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton) is for four more years of Obama, and we can’t take it,” adding that she is one of the people who caused the problems he rails against in the first place, a statement that elicited boos and catcalls from the audience.

“Hillary Clinton has been there for 30 years and hasn’t fixed anything. She talks and talks and talks.”

He seemed to address the controversy regarding a nearly $1 billion loss he claimed on his 1996 income taxes, which got him out of paying further taxes for years, when he said he made his money “as a very successful private businessperson, following the laws of our country.”

He contrasted that with his assertion that Clinton “made her money as a corrupt public official, violating the law, and putting her government office up for sale.”

He told the stories of several people who he said had been murdered by people in the country illegally, calling them casualties of the “Obama-Clinton open border policy.”

Trump also again said that he had been endorsed by Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the Border Patrol, a statement that both have publicly denied.

Summing up his candidacy, he asked the rhetorical question, “What the hell do you have to lose?”

He listed what he said he planned to do in 2017 if elected:

• “The biggest-job creating tax cut since Ronald Reagan;”

• “Stop the jobs from leaving our country;”

• “Repeal and replace Obamacare;”

• “Save our Second Amendment, which is under siege;”

• “Support our great men and women of law enforcement;”

• “Appoint justices to the United States Supreme Court who will uphold and defend the Constitution.”

The event ended after about an hour-long speech, with Trump waving as he left the stage to the Rolling Stones song, “You Can’t Always Get What You Want.”

Four protesters were arrested. One interrupted Trump’s speech, to which he said, “Get him out of here,” and waited before continuing until the man had been taken away by officers.

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