McCain wins another term

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., waits to be introduced at his victory party prior to announcing his victory over Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in Phoenix.

AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., waits to be introduced at his victory party prior to announcing his victory over Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in Phoenix.

Eight years after losing his bid for president, five-term GOP Sen. John McCain turned away a determined challenge from Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick.

McCain publicly struggled with whether to support GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, who called McCain a loser and criticized him for being captured during the Vietnam War.

The 80-year-old McCain reluctantly stood by Trump for months despite the personal insults, but ended his tepid support last month after the release of a 2005 recording in which Trump used crude, predatory language to boast about groping women.

McCain said Trump's behavior and "demeaning comments about women" made it impossible to support him.

The decision angered some Republicans, who routinely boo when Trump mentions McCain's name.

U.S. Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick of Arizona says she's congratulated Republican U.S. Sen. John McCain for his win and pointed to some key victories for Democrats in the conservative state.

Kirkpatrick represented McCain's strongest challenge in years, but his prolific fundraising and name recognition proved too difficult to overcome Tuesday. Kirkpatrick's candidacy never gained the traction it needed.

She told her supporters that they had made progress, highlighting the passage of a statewide minimum wage increase and the loss of longtime Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

Kirkpatrick tells The Associated Press that she thanked McCain for a civil campaign that never sunk to personal attacks.

Meanwhile, hundreds of cheering McCain supporters chanted the senator's name at this victory party. He thanked them while acknowledging the acrimony of this year's election.