Editorial: Thinking ahead fuels Ducey vetoes, a bit

The headlines keep streaming out of the Capitol, this time vetoes on gold, towing fees and the line of succession.

Gov. Doug Ducey vetoed three bills Thursday, among others, that show some fortitude, foresight and lack of judgment.

First up is a bill that would cut taxes on the sale of gold and silver coins. Senate Bill 1141 was the latest effort – former Gov. Jan Brewer also dismissed a version – to cut taxes on trading in U.S. coins considered legal tender.

The measure would have allowed state deductions on capital gains to be paid to the federal government. Ducey said it contained broad language that could have unintended consequences, according to the Associated Press.

Second, and somewhat related, was his veto of a bill that would have boosted fees towing companies receive from the state. It reportedly would have resulted in a $1 million hit to the state budget.

Both of these remind me of the alternative fuels debacle. In 2000, the state was refunding (giving tax credits) to people who bought new vehicles the expense of adding an alternative-fuel tank to burn cleaner fuel.

Problem: it was intended to be a $10 million program, but it turned into a $200 million mess. Literally. From the state’s side, too many people took part. Essentially, an environmental goodwill program backfired like the polluting cars it was designed to clean up.

If our leaders do not ask how big or out of control a program could become – at the outset – we could have more to worry about than we already do.

So, kudos to Ducey.

However, Ducey also vetoed legislation Thursday requiring a top elected official to be absent during inaugurations or speeches, in case of attack.

The far-thinking governor apparently does not believe anything bad could happen, planned or by chance, necessitating a guaranteed line of succession.

The federal government makes sure the President, Vice President and their successors are never, or are rarely, all in the same place at the same time.

Think about it, the Governor didn’t.