Prescott welcomes another British invasion

It’s a tribute to the classic British Rock bands with Lonely Street Productions’ “British Invasion” on Saturday, Feb. 13, at 7 p.m. (Courtesy photo)

It’s a tribute to the classic British Rock bands with Lonely Street Productions’ “British Invasion” on Saturday, Feb. 13, at 7 p.m. (Courtesy photo)

The British are coming, the British are coming ... again. However, this time, they'll be heading to the Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center, 117 E. Gurley St., as Lonely Street Productions presents "The British Invasion: Rock and Roll from Across the Pond." The show's performers, Alex Mack, Dan Green and Will Leonard, will be playing hits from bands like The Animals, The Rolling Stones, Cream, and Herman's Hermits.

Mack has been in this incarnation of the show since earlier in February, but performed in two other similar shows last October. It presents the music that inspired him to start playing guitar and singing, he said.

"I'm going back to what I started on, even though it was before my time," he said.

Mack said it's difficult to pinpoint his favorite song in the show, but there are a couple of Cream songs that are very fun to play. He gets to let go on them with the show's other guitar player and it's a blast, he added.

Green said he enjoys the songs originally performed by The Hollies due to the great vocal harmonies.

Compared to the other shows brought about by Lonely Street Productions, this one is very diverse said Green, noting that the '60s branched out to some outrageous stuff, mixing rock, psychedelic, harmony vocals and more, he said.

"The challenge is to pull off all those styles," Green said.

Tickets are $25 for adults and $22 for seniors and can be purchased online at www.prescottelkstheater.com, by calling 928-777-1370 or at the door one hour prior to the performance.

The show works to make it authentic to the era when the songs were originally played, Green said. That includes singing with the same style of harmonies the bands originally brought audiences and a change of clothes halfway through the concert. However, while keeping true to the original sound, the songs are not carbon copies of those played by the original bands, Mack said.

In performing the show, it's shocking to see how many in the audience end up singing along, Mack said, noting that they know all the songs.

"They've known them all their young adult lives," he said. "A lot of memories are tied up in them."