Their actions deserve thorough look-see

The developments just keep coming at Yavapai College.

In the past week, one more member of the seven-member Yavapai College executive leadership team resigned. Human Resources Director Rose Hurley's dramatic departure at a Thursday news conference made her the fourth of President Doreen Dailey's direct-report subordinates to resign in the past two months.

She joined team members Terry Bowmaster, vice president for finance and facilities; Project Manager Neil Goodell and Provost Bob Salmon, not to mention Governing Board Member Jim Holt.

Hurley said she was resigning because Dailey had asked another staff member to go through team members' offices while they weren't there.

Public Information Officer Sue Sammarco sent Dailey an e-mail that she also copied to the Courier and others in which she said Dailey had asked her to search other team members' offices. Sammarco said that when she refused, Dailey said she'd hire a private investigator to do it. She added that she no longer will remain silent about Dailey's "lies and half-truths."

Oh, by the way, the faculty association voted "no confidence" in Dailey, and the faculty senate voted "no confidence" in Dailey and the board.

Several of the departed leadership team members, Holt and State Rep. Lucy Mason all have asked Attorney General Terry Goddard to investigate possible violations of the Open Meeting Law act by Dailey, Governing Board Chairman Ed Harris and Board Secretary Herald Herrington.

Mason asked Goddard to do a more comprehensive investigation of college leadership, governance and finances.

So far, Goddard hasn't said much, but he did ask the college administration for information. We agree with Dr. Dailey and the board that she and the board deserve a fair hearing, but Dr. Dailey and the board also are the objects of serious complaints.

If that's the extent of Goddard's investigation, why does that not inspire much confidence?